Reasons for a Property Protection Trust

A Property Protection Trust is designed to help and protect your property from creditors including an assessment for long term care fees.

Our Property Protection Trust will ensure that your estate is kept intact by protecting your share of your home (or other property, if required) or the value in it.

We do this by firstly changing Joint ownership of the property to Tenants in Common usually each owning 50% this then enables you to “Will” your share to your chosen beneficiary via your Family Trust.

By leaving your share of the property in a Trust with a life interest to your partner/spouse you safeguard your assets from being lost should your partner re-marry, or be diluted if that partnership ends in divorce. It also protects the trust property from bankruptcy and care costs in later life for the surviving partner.

Importantly the Trust also protects the interests of the survivor, allowing them to live in the property until their death, (or, if required, until they cohabit or remarries.) If the survivor then goes on to remarry, they cannot leave the whole of the property to their new spouse, as a portion is already owned by the Trustees on behalf of the chosen beneficiaries. The survivor can also move house if they so wish, using the whole of the proceeds towards another property, or raise capital by purchasing a smaller property, a greater proportion of which will then be owned by the Trustees.

  • Typical Example

On first death, the Deceased’s share of the property is passed into their Trust via the Will. The surviving spouse/ partner continues to live in the property and is still able to move home if they choose to do so.

In the event that the survivor enters Care, the survivor only owns a half share of a house

 

PPT1

  • Benefits

Care
Holding the assets in the Trust ensures that they do not add onto the Beneficiaries’ own estates and so cannot be assessed for their Care costs.

Marriage After Death
Placing half of the family home and other assets into a Trust on first death ensures that, should the surviving spouse/partner marry in the future, those assets cannot
be taken into the marriage and removes the threat of your own children being disinherited. The survivor is still able to use the assets in the Trust.

Creditors or Bankruptcy
Similarly, if any of your Beneficiaries are subject to Creditor Claims/Bankruptcy then their inheritance would not be exposed to these claims.

Divorce
Placing the assets into Trust ensures that, if your children/ chosen Beneficiaries are subject to Divorce proceedings then what you intended them to receive is protected from any Divorce settlements.

Further or Generational IHT
Holding the assets in the Trust ensures that they do not add to the Beneficiaries’ estates and impact on their own Inheritance Tax

Residence Nil Rate Band (RNRB)
Our trusts ensure that if there are lineal descendants as beneficiaries, the trust will still qualify for the RNRB.

Remember that making a basic double Will
only guarantees what happens on 1st death

 

Without the correct planning, some or all of your children’s or grandchildren’s  inheritance could be lost. However, with a few simple strategies we can protect you and your family from needless expense and worry.

Consider the Facts…

  • Everyone should have a Will, but 2 out of 3 people have not yet made a Will and those that have, may not have the correct Will in place
  • Many of the population lose their homes and / or savings to pay for care.
  • A large proportion of any inheritance is lost in future divorce settlements, to creditors or bankruptcy and unnecessary taxation.

Peace of mind is just a phone call away! Call us today on 0161 771 2056 or enter your details below…

Finance North Estate Planning Services
Cheshire Office – 0161 771 2056
Staffordshire Office 01782 963 303

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This page contains only general planning advice and is not to be construed as advice for any specific personal planning. Each strategy recommended is based on individual circumstances.

 

How to prevent things going wrong with your Lasting Power of Attorney

With dementia continuing to rise, the importance of Lasting Powers of Attorney (LPA) cannot be overstated. An LPA can be a vital tool, giving a friend, loved one or solicitor the power to make decisions on your behalf should you reach a position where you are unable to.

Safeguards are built into them to ensure they are used appropriately, but there are steps you can take to ensure things do not go wrong.

Choose the right attorney

If you want to prevent any future issues with an LPA, then choosing the right attorney at the outset is crucial. There are many duties involved in acting as an attorney for someone, so you need to pick someone responsible and organised, as well as someone who knows you well and can be trusted to act in your best interests.

You may want to select more than one attorney – this will make abuse of the powers associated with an LPA much harder.

If you do choose more than one attorney, you can set out whether they need to act together or separately for certain issues.

Informing loved ones

One important safeguard is the fact that the ‘donor’ (the person handing over their powers to their attorney) can name up to five people who must be informed before the LPA is registered. It’s important to do this – these loved ones can then step in and dispute the registration, should they believe that the donor was put under undue pressure or the attorney is set to behave in an inappropriate way

It’s a good idea to speak to your friends and loved ones who aren’t named on the document in advance of organising an LPA too. You can explain why you are doing it and how you want the powers to be used – this can help reduce the chances of fraud and should also reduce the chances of conflict between family members later on.

Guidance

Another safeguard is the ability for donors to have certain guidance for the attorney written into the LPA. For example, this may suggest that they meet a couple of times a year to go through bank details and discuss financial arrangements for the next six months. This should also make it harder for any fraud to take place.

Organising an LPA can give you peace of mind that you will have someone you trust making decisions for you, should you lose the ability to do so.

Choosing the right attorney, and getting the right LPA in place, can take some time, but it is time well spent.

If you’re struggling to choose an LPA or would like advice on how to appoint one, feel free to get in touch with us at Finance North Estate Planning Services on one of the numbers below.

Cheshire Office: 0161 771 2056 or Staffordshire Office: 01782 963 303

Or simply complete you details below and one of our consultants will call you back.

Finance North Estate Planning Services
Pole Farm Cottage, Pole Lane, Antrobus, Cheshire, CW9 6NN
The Dudson Centre, Hope Street, Stoke on Trent, ST1 5DD

www.FinanceNorthEPS.co.uk