How wealthy families keep their wealth.

David Cameron’s father’s will makes interesting reading.

He left a fortune of £2,740,000 from which the ex-Prime Minister received the sum of £300,000, but what is interesting is that:-

  • He appointed his children as Executors and Trustees.
  • He and his wife owned their home as Tenants in Common rather than joint owners.
  • His half of the home went into Trust rather than directly to his widow.

 

Cameron Will

 

Trusts have been instrumental in mitigating tax since the Medieval times. Trusts were initially created for the Nobility and wealthy landowners to avoid paying taxes to the Crown. Nowadays, you don’t have to be a Nobleman, or a wealthy landowner to want to take advantage of the many tax strategies Trusts can provide.

The use of Trusts ensures that assets are protected from attack from the following.

  • Care Fees
  • Divorce / Separation
  • Creditors / Bankruptcy
  • Inheritance Tax
  • Generational Inheritance Tax

We have advised many clients from all walks of life in protecting their homes and other assets, so that their children and grandchildren can maximise their inheritance, and we have now launched a fixed price package to specifically tackle the above problems at an affordable price for all home owners and from all walks of life.

Firstly you will receive a free no obligation home visit from one of our trained consultants which usually takes about 1hr where you can ask any questions and discuss the matter in more detail.

Once you have decided to proceed we will take all the necessary instructions and then commence constructing a Will each, a Flexible Family Trust each with Memorandum of Wishes and also a Deed of Severance. Within approximately 2 weeks your consultant will return with all the documents for signing.

 

PPT

On first death, the deceased’s share of the property is passed into their Flexible Family Trust via the Will. The surviving Spouse or Partner continues to live in the property and is still able to move home if they choose to do so. In the event that the survivor enters care, the survivor only owns half a share of the family home.

The beneficiaries have access to the Trust Funds but we ensure that these assets do not enter their estates and so are protected from attack by the following:

  • Marriage after Death – Placing half of the family home and other assets into a Trust on first death ensures that, should the surviving spouse or partner marry in the future, those assets cannot be taken into the marriage and removes the threat of your children being disinherited.
  • Divorce – Placing your assets into a trust ensures if your children or chosen beneficiaries are subject to a divorce then what you intended them to receive is protected from any divorce settlements.
  • Creditors – Similarly if any of your beneficiaries are subject to Creditor claims or bankruptcy then their inheritance would not be exposed to these claims.
  • Care Costs – The trust ensures that they do not add onto the beneficiaries own estates and so cannot be assessed for their care costs.
  • Further or Generational IHT – Holding the assets in the trust ensures that they do not add to the beneficiaries estates and impact on their own Inheritance Tax.

For more information, please call 0161 771 2056 or simply complete the form below
and one of our consultants will gladly answer any questions you may have.

Finance North
Estate Planning Services
Offices in Cheshire and Staffordshire

www.FinanceNorthEPS.co.uk

 

 

 

How Can Trusts Help With Inheritance Tax Burdens?

There are few taxes more unpopular than inheritance tax. A poll by the financial website, loveMONEY last year found that an incredible 90% of Brits believe it is unfair.

However, there are a number of perfectly legitimate ways to reduce the amount of tax your estate will have to pay. One of those is making use of a Trust.

What is a Trust?

A Trust is a legal arrangement where your assets – such as property, cash or investments – are given to trustees, who will oversee them for the benefit of a third person. For example, you might want to put some savings into a Trust which your children can then benefit from at a later date.

When you place items into a Trust, they technically no longer belong to you. As a result, when it comes to working out the inheritance tax due on your estate, they aren’t included.

Instead, the assets belong to the Trust. The trustees are charged with managing those assets in the interest of the beneficiaries you have named, until some time when those beneficiaries can take control.

The many different types of Trust

Trusts come in a variety of different forms, which will suit different circumstances.

The simplest form is a Bare Trust – this basically hands over ownership of the assets to the beneficiary immediately, so long as they are over the age of 18.

Alternatively, there is an Interest in Possession Trust. This gives the beneficiary income from the assets held within the Trust, but they don’t have a right to the assets generating that income. An example of this is that you might put shares in this form of Trust which would pay an income to your partner, but your children would get ownership of the shares themselves once your partner died.

Then there is the Discretionary Trust, which is where the trustees have responsibility for deciding how the assets within the Trust are distributed. You could therefore leave assets in the Trust for your grandchildren, with your children named as the trustees. They could then determine who gets what at a later date.

Dividing your assets

Trusts are a useful way to take control of passing on your assets to your loved ones and can serve as a complement to a comprehensive Will. Without a Will in place, you have no say on who will get your assets and could put your loved ones through further heartache after your passing.

To discuss your Will and estate planning needs today, speak to Finance North Estate Planning Services 0161 771 2056.

Finance North Estate Planning Services
Offices in Cheshire & Staffordshire

The Cost Of Dying Is Increasing

The Government is introducing a new fee structure that will affect the cost of accessing an estate when someone dies.

Fees for Applications for Grant of Probate or Letters of Administration (for when someone dies intestate) will be changing and could eventually impact you and your family when you’re no longer around.

The new fees will take effect from May 2017. At the moment, the fees are set at either £155 if probate is applied for by a Solicitor or £215 if it is applied for by friends or family. There are no fees if the value of the estate is less than £5,000.

The first change is that estates below £50,000 will no longer have to pay any probate fee. This significantly increases the number of estates exempt from the fees. Unfortunately, everyone one else will see an increase, with those with the largest estates seeing fees of up to £20,000.

The fees are tiered depending on the value of the estate:

  • £50k – £300k = £300 fee
  • £300k – £500k = £1,000 fee
  • £500k – £1M = £4,000 fee
  • £1M – £1.6M = £8,000 fee
  • £1.6M – £2M = £12,000 fee
  • Above £2M = £20,000 fee

These fees are in addition to inheritance tax (IHT).

When somebody dies, the executors must apply for a Grant of Probate from the probate registry. This needs to be done to allow them to administer the estate according to the terms of the Will. These fees need to be paid up front. It may be difficult if the executor is not able to release cash from the deceased’s bank account and/or the executor is on a low wage or benefits.

Previously they may have been able to apply to get help with the fees. However, the Government is also removing probate applications from the general fees remissions scheme and financial help will no longer be available.

There are things to consider which may reduce the amount of probate needing to be paid. In particular, married couples or those in a civil partnership should consider the nature of any property ownership agreements they hold.

Another way to reduce the cost of probate is to consider setting up a Trust. This may lower the value of the estate (from a probate point of view) and drop it from a higher tier rate to a lower one.

Trust law is complex. You will need advice from a specialist to ensure you are setting one up in the most tax efficient way, so that it doesn’t end up costing you more than you hope to save.

For advice on this or any aspect of Estate Planning or Will Writing, please call Finance North Estate Planning Services on 0161 771 2056, or complete the enquiry form below for more information.

The New Tax Band: What If My Property Is In Trust?

The way properties are judged for Inheritance Tax is about to change.

This month (April 2017), the new Residence Nil Rate Band (RNRB) will be introduced. This new band will allow parents to hand more of their estate over to their children without having to pay Inheritance Tax.

Currently, an individual does not pay Inheritance Tax on an estate worth less than £325,000. This increases to £650,000 for couples.

However, the RNRB, something which former Chancellor George Osborne announced, means an end to Inheritance Tax on the family home for most of us. It is essentially an extension to the current tax-free allowance, but applying solely to property. It initially stands at £100,000, but will increase over the next four years until hitting £175,000 in 2020/21.

In order to qualify for the RNRB, the estate must include a qualifying property – basically a property that the deceased lived in at some point during ownership. That property must also pass to a direct descendant, such as a child or grandchild. Finally, the value of the estate cannot exceed £2 million. For every £2 over this limit that your estate is valued, the relief is reduced by £1.

It could save families a huge amount in tax. Things can, however, become complicated if the property is held in Trust.

Why hold a property in Trust?

Trusts can be very useful for people who want to cut their Inheritance Tax bill. By putting certain assets – like a property – into a Trust, they are not viewed as being part of your estate when the time comes to work out what Inheritance Tax your loved ones will have to pay.

While some forms of Trust will benefit from the RNRB, others will not.

The RNRB will only be available with the following Trusts:

  • A Bare Trust for a lineal descendant
  • An Immediate Post Death Interest Trust for a lineal descendant
  • A disabled person’s Trust for a lineal descendant
  • An 18-25 Trust
  • A bereaved minor’s Trust.

Other Trusts will not benefit, for example if the property is left to a basic Discretionary Trust, RNRB will not be available, even if the beneficiaries of the Trust are a lineal descendant.

So how do we maintain the flexibility and protection that a Discretionary Trust offers whilst ensuring that our clients do not miss out on the RNRA?

One less reported aspect of the RNRA and its impact, is how the Trustees can benefit from a strategy in a little known section of the Inheritance Tax Act 1984 (Section 144) which gives the Trustees the power to make their choice later, and decide who is best to inherit within two years of a death. Two years to pick and choose the best person to receive this new RNRA allowance, that person most likely being the youngest member of the family.

But what if the Trustees forget?

Some clients choose their Spouses to be their Trustees, others choose their children and some may pick “John” from down the pub. Are these Trustees likely to know that they have two years to jump into action, probably not?

So we shouldn’t risk using Discretionary Trusts, hoping that the Trustees will miraculously remember to do their job? There is much merit in that argument.

The New Flexible Family Trust

What if we were to offer a Discretionary Trust that means our clients do not have to “speculate” who would be the best person to receive the RNRA at the time they make their Will? A Trust that gives the Trustees a chance to choose the best person at the date of death, BUT also ensures that if the Trustees neglect to do so, the allowance will be received REGARDLESS by default in the terms of the Trust.

We therefore present the
NEW FLEXIBLE FAMILY TRUST!

Our new Trust ticks all of the boxes. The flexibility within two years of death to “pick the right person” but also with the security in knowing that if the Trustees are “sitting on their hands”, the trust defaults for them, ensuring that the relief is never lost.

Jon O’Brien from Finance North Estate Planning Services says: “Working out exactly who should get what after you pass away takes a lot of thought and planning. Getting a comprehensive Will in place is crucial. Please come and speak to us today on 0161 771 2056 to receive expert advice.”

The Pitfall of Gifting Assets

It’s no secret that there is a care crisis in the UK.

In order to deliver social care, the Government is being forced to consider increasing council tax to help cover the costs. However, the cost facing the individual, should they require care, could be very high too.

If you have savings and assets worth more than £23,250 in England and Northern Ireland (rising to £24,000 in Wales or £26,250 in Scotland), or a weekly income high enough to cover care fees, then you will not be eligible for local authority funding. In other words, you’ll have to pay for your own care.

In order to reduce their care liabilities, older people may therefore look to giving away their assets to loved ones. However, where gifting is concerned, there are strict rules which must be followed.

  • Deliberate deprivation

It’s not easy to hide the fact that you may have tried to give your property away to your children or grandchildren. Local authorities will carry out a financial assessment, looking not only at your current assets, but also those that you have previously owned.

If they believe you have given away assets intentionally, in order to qualify for funding from the local authority, they may find that you have indulged in ‘deliberate deprivation’. This may include selling assets for less than their true value, as well as giving them away.

  • What makes it deliberate?

To determine whether the disposal of assets was deliberate, the local authority will look at a number of things. These include:
– What your apparent motive was,
– The timing of the gift (i.e. the time between you realising you need care and when       you disposed of the asset),
– The amount of assets involved.

For example, they are less likely to investigate you if you give away £500 than if you are handing over £50,000.

If it is found that you have deliberately deprived yourself of those assets, even if you no longer own them, their value may be considered in the financial assessment. If the local authority does fund someone’s care costs, and later discover that the individual deliberately deprived themselves of assets, they can pursue that asset transferee in order to recover some of those care costs.

It’s not just during your life that you need to carefully plan how to hand your assets over to your loved ones. It is also vital to put together a plan for what happens after you die. This means ensuring you have a professional will in place. With important issues such as these, it pays to work with those who really know what they are doing. We can help.

For more information with protecting your assets during your lifetime and after your death call Finance North Estate Planning Services on 0161 771 2056, or enter your details in the enquiry form below.

Finance North Estate Planning Services
0161 771 2056

If you don’t have a Will, the Government has written this one for you …

104139674

Be worried, very worried…

 

To my Family
I hereby leave you all – months, possibly years of financial hardship and expense whilst you go to unnecessary efforts to sort out my affairs.

To my Spouse
I hereby leave you some – but maybe not all if everything I own.

To my Children
I hereby leave you the remainder of my estate and give you the authority to enforce the sale or any part of it – including the family home – to realise your inheritance.

To Social Services
If my children are orphaned I give you the authority and guardianship and the power to choose who shall look after them, including allocating them to foster patents.

To the Tax Man
I hereby leave you all the tax that I could have avoided and given the money instead to my family.

To my Bank and or Solicitor
I hereby authorise you to charge whatever you feel necessary to sort out the mess that I have left behind. I realise that this could make you one of the major beneficiaries of my estate.

To everyone else
I leave you nothing

Yours Shamefully
I’ll do it tomorrow

 



Be Smart Call 0161 771 2056 – If not for you, for your family!

http://www.FinanceNorthEPS.co.ukHelp@FinanceNorthEPS.co.uk


 

Free Will Review Service

Review (1)

Today’s fast and furious lifestyles that we seem to take as standard dictate changes to our personal circumstances frequently, so it makes sense to review your existing Will on a regular basis.

You should review your Will every 5 years and after any major change in your life, for example if the executor or guardian named in your Will dies, you have a new child or grandchild etc. Below are examples of some of the most important times when you should review your Will.

Have you had any life changing events such as :-

Divorce/Separated
Married
Birth of new child/grandchild
Changes in your financial situation
Retirement
Moved home

A Will Review can check that your existing Will protects you and your beneficiaries from :-

Inheritance Tax
Selling your home to pay for long term care costs
Divorce settlements
Creditors/Bankruptcy

How can I receive my free Will review? Simple Call 0161 771 2056 or email help@financenortheps.co.uk with the word “Review” in the header and state your name and contact number and we will call you straight back.